Forensics TV Review: BBC’s Ripper Street on NetFlix

Ripper Street, BBC to Amazon to Netflix...who cares where, the show is just great.

This is a Forensics TV Review of BBC’s Ripper Street on Netflix. It is a bit of a deviation from the norm here at CriminalJusticeLaw.org, but I couldn’t help myself. I have always been a fan of mysteries, detective, and forensics shows. At one time, I believed that nothing could ever top CSI: Miami. That is until I discovered a BBC production Ripper Street. The show is now on NetFlix (or maybe I just recently discovered it). Already into season one, I am hooked.

Review by C J Oakes

Forensics in the Days of Jack the Ripper

Inspector Edmund Reid, surely PD because it wa...
Inspector Edmund Reid, surely PD because it was taken during his service and he retired in 1896. He was head of Metropolitan Police CID during the time of the Jack the Ripper case. He retired to Hampton-on-Sea, Herne Bay, Kent, England, where he championed the cause of his village which was suffering sea-erosion. The site of the village is now underwater. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Although set in the late 1880s London, in the Whitechapel district, the show holds strong dramatic appeal and excellent acting. Season One introduces us to the key players, namely Captain Homer Jackson and Detective Inspector Edmund Reid. Jackson, played by Adam Rothenberg is a former Pinkerton man who also served in the U.S. Army as a surgeon.  He is on the run from America but we don’t know why. What we do know is that somehow he and Ried have become known to each other, with the doctor being transformed into a fine forensics examiner at a time when forensics was in its infancy.

The character of Reid it seems is based on the real Metropolitan Police Inspector by the same name who was head of the department at the time of Jack the Ripper.

However, it is the strange element of fantasy forensics which makes the drama most interesting. For example. In episode one, Inspector Reid sends for Captain Jackson because there has been a body found that may be a victim of Jack the Ripper. The Ripper had disappeared months earlier and has not been heard from, so the detective is especially interested in determining whether this is his work or that of another.  Not going to be a spoiler so you’ll just have to watch the show to find out.

But in the course of examining the body, the early-fictional-forensics-examiner Captain Jackson uncovers a gelatine substance that leads to a surprising resolution of the case. In the episodes to follow, this fantasy forensic Quincy ME helps unravel mystery after mystery, applying science to murder in ways that have never before been seen (except to us, of course).

Little else needs saying about Ripper Street other than, if you like forensics mystery police shows and period dramas, you should really like this one.

The program aired originally on BBC, then was picked up by Amazon for two more seasons, and is running on both Prime and Netflix. Look for it. Great programming.

CJOakes
President, Publisher at Criminal Justice Law
C J Oakes is an author and freelance writer from Lubbock, TX, USA. In addition to this website, he operates OakesWriting.com and BuyLocalLubbock.com.

As an author, he has numerous books to his credit including the best-selling Survive and Thrive After the Collapse of the Dollar series. In addition, he has written over a hundred books for clients since 2011 and has created innumerable web pages for law firms around the nation.

Justice is a passion for Mr. Oakes. He believes that the scales of justice are never balanced, but it is the duty of each citizen to do their part to re-calibrate the scales as needed. When the scales of justice shift too far to one side, they must be returned a near as possible to center. So he built this site with the goal of helping students of criminal justice understand how to apply the principles needed for re-calibrating the scales.

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